Patriot
"It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible." George Washington
Several members of the Commander-in-Chief's Guard were involved in a shadowy conspiracy early in the war. In the spring of 1776, Sergeant Thomas Hickey, a member of the Guard, was arrested in New York for passing counterfeit money. Hickey revealed to another prisoner that he was part of a wider conspiracy of soldiers who were prepared to defect to the British once the expected invasion of New York came. The conspiracy became greatly exaggerated in rumor, and was alleged to include plans to kidnap Washington, assassinate him and his officers, and blow up the Continental Army's ammunition magazines. Hickey was executed in New York on June 28, 1776, before a crowd of 20,000 spectators.

Commander-in-Chief Muster Rolls

The Most Complete Commander-in-Chief Guards Muster Roll Known to Exist

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Refernces

  1. Pension Application - this veteran filed a signed affidavit attesting to his service and referenced his service in the Commander-in-Chief Guards. These records are available at the Liberty of Congress in Washington, D.C.
  2. Land Warrant - this veteran was granted land bounty and had to sign an affidavit attesting to his service and referenced his service in the Commander-in-Chief Guards. These records are available at the Liberty of Congress in Washington, D.C.
  3. The May 1777 Pay Record of George Lewis’s 3rd Regiment of Continental Light Dragoons - showing when the troopers joined this regiment.
  4. From the Carlos F. Godfrey book - The Commander-in-Chief Guards”, published in 1906. He provided a biographical section on the members of the Guard. Those that had received a pension or land bounty were so foot noted. However, there are 95 foot notes showing the information came from individuals. Godfrey does not explain what criteria he used to confirm this information. Unless confirmed by another source, any entry showing only a (d) reference should be considered questionable.
  5. The State of Pennsylvania collected service records of the Veterans of the Revolution and published them in the Pennsylvania Archives. Those Pennsylvania Soldiers that serve in theaCommander-in-Chief Guards are listed in Volume VXL, on page 122.
  6. Captain William Colfax prepared a roster of the members of the Commander-in-Chief’s Guard on March 3rd, 1783. A copy is at the National Archives.
  7. Captain B. Howe, prepared a roster of the members of the Commander-in-Chief’s Guards made up of soldiers from the 2nd New Hampshire Regiment, on October 22nd, 1783. It was transcribed by Corporal Asa Redington, a member of the Guard, and has survived with his journal at Stanford University in California. Unfortunately Asa Redington recorded the rank and surnames of each soldier, omitting his given name. By going through 2nd New Hampshire Regiment’s muster rolls we were able to find the names of those soldier’s who’s full names were known from other sources, and the surnames of most of those on Redington’s roster. Armed with their full names were we able to positively identify four from their pension files. We are confident that the names of the soldiers coded (g) are accurate. The muster rolls used are at the National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  8. Muster Roll of the Commander-in-Chief’s Guards, for July, 1777 - Copy at the National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  9. Muster Roll of the Commander-in-Chief’s Guards, for June, 1778 - Copy at the National Archives, Washington, D.C. (26 of the 135 names were illegible)
  10. Muster Roll of the Commander-in-Chief’s Guards for March 1782 - Copy at the National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  11. “The Tullis Tracer” - newsletter.